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Track offenders with GPS recorders!
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
Posts: 9207
Location: Jacksonville, FL

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CNN is reporting that the Florida Senate is moving a bill along that would electronically monitor sex offenders. The US House would only trigger it if the offender wasn't responding to random mailings to confirm address.

These electronic monitorings being referred to I believe are the expensive kind, a broadcast that is monitored and recorded with at least the capability of officers locating the signal on a map.

However, my goal is to actually reduce costs, not increase them. There should be more, cheaper jail cells in remote places where land has no other use and there's plenty of room to find an escapee. And an isolation of prisoners from each other and the working areas of the prisons and the rest of the world other than electronic communication. Just give them a cage with a treadmill and drop Army MRE food in. It's good enough for our troops, it's good enough for our prisoners.

The GPS ankle bracelet recorder I have in mind would only record movements, not broadcast them. On the other hand, the parolee would have to visit their probation officer once a week, which they should have to do anyway, and the bracelet would be downloaded to a computer network. The movements would go into a searchable database.

I do not consider that effort burdensome. The convicted violent felon parollee would be rejailed if he's not showing up and they don't get the data. The data shows where he has been, which would be randomly looked at to confirm address but even more importantly every crime location would be typed into the database and every felon in the location during that time questioned.

What changes everything is that every tracked felon not there is essentially cleared. The savings in police investigation work would be astronomical. We just don't know where to spend money to save far more money.

We'll need those cheap prison cells if we're serious about locking up parole violators. I doubt we're serious enough yet though. I wonder how many more innocent young women have to die before we are.

rd
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

from www.CNN. com (fair use)

Congress gets Lunsford legislation
Poe: 'I hope we ... can quit naming bills after murdered children'
April 22, 2005

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Members of Congress on Thursday were introduced to legislation that would require states to keep closer tabs on convicted sex offenders not behind bars.

The legislation would be called the Jessica Lunsford Act in honor of the Homosassa, Florida, girl who was allegedly abducted and slain by a convicted sex offender.

"Jessica Lunsford's murder is a horrifying example of the need for stricter laws regulating sex offenders," said the bill's sponsor, Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite, a Florida Republican, via her Web site.

"While individual states have passed legislation targeting sexual offenders and predators, I feel that we need to have strong federal guidelines for states to follow."

Lunsford's father, Mark, and other lawmakers joined Brown-Waite at a news conference Thursday to discuss the legislation.

"Eight weeks ago I had a beautiful 9-year-old daughter who was the light of my life," said Mark Lunsford. "I will never see Jessie go on her first date. I will never be a grandfather to her children."

Police have said John Evander Couey, 46, confessed to kidnapping, sexually assaulting and murdering Jessica Lunsford. He is charged with capital murder, and prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.

Jessica's body was found last month, buried behind Couey's half-sister's home, where Couey had been living.

Last Saturday, the body of another Florida girl, 13-year-old Sarah Michelle Lunde, was found in a pond.

Sex offender David Onstott, who previously dated the girl's mother, told authorities he choked the teen and dumped her body there a week earlier, Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee said. (Full story)

Currently, states are supposed to send sex offenders an annual mailer with an address verification form.

Under the Jessica Lunsford Act, states would be required to send the mailers semiannually and at random times, so offenders don't know when to expect them.

For those who do not answer the mailers, the legislation would increase penalties to imprisonment and a $100,000 fine. Any offender who fails twice to register with a state or fails more than once to answer a mailer would be required to wear an electronic ankle monitor.

"No longer will these sexual offenders and predators be repeatedly ignoring the letter of the law and be allowed to roam the streets at will," Brown-Waite said.

Lunsford's father said, "To me, it's pretty simple: It makes states' sex-offender laws much stronger, and makes states do what they should already be doing to register sex offenders and protect our kids."

The bill is currently in the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, according to a congressional bill-tracking site. Brown-Waite said 43 lawmakers have signed on.

The Florida Senate is now considering a bill, also called the Jessica Lunsford Act, that would impose longer sentences and tougher penalties for convicted sex offenders. It would mandate that, after their release, the offenders be electronically monitored for the rest of their lives. The Florida House unanimously approved a similar bill Tuesday.

Rep. Ted Poe, a Republican Congressman from Texas, has introduced legislation that would make the FBI's database of sex offenders available to the general public, Brown-Waite said.

"The reason we're here is because of a little girl who was 9 years old and lived in Florida," Poe said. "I hope we get to the day in this country when we can quit naming bills after murdered children."
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

and GPS in NYC. Taxpayers will initially balk at the cost. The GPS tracking data has to be collected and stored where it would make these violent felons know we know where they are, and in the process massive amounts of fairly worthless attempts to get alibis from the usual suspects would be eliminated.

Many of these people would be rejailed in short order. Our streets would be cleared. We would spend a lot less money and have a lot less crime. Not a hope, just a fact.

rd

from www.wnbc.com (fair use)

Westchester Sex Offenders May Be Tracked By Satellite
Spano Spells Out Details In State Of The County
April 22, 2005

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- Westchester County may soon be using a global positioning system to track the movements of convicted sex offenders, County Executive Andrew Spano said Thursday.

In his annual State of the County speech, Spano said the county probation department can use the system "to restrict a sex offender's movements, set up exclusion zones to restrict access to children and know exactly where a sex offender is 24 hours a day."

He asked that judges impose GPS monitoring, which uses space satellites and a bracelet, on all sex offenders newly sentenced to probation.

Currently, convicted sex offenders on probation must register with local law enforcement and report when they move, but authorities can only make spot checks. National surveys have shown that about one-fourth of released sex offenders have moved, failed to report new addresses to police and eluded detection.

GPS tracking, which is being used or considered in several states, would mean a convict's whereabouts could be checked remotely at any time.

"Just as importantly, these dangerous predators will know they are being watched," Spano said.

The county executive, a Democrat who is running for a third four-year term, used the speech to trumpet accomplishments in adding services while streamlining the government. He also announced:

--A program between Family Court and the White Plains Police Department to get orders of protection electronically for potential victims of violence.

-- A 211 phone system for health and human service information.

--The end of the ticketing system at Playland, the county-owned amusement park in Rye. Debit cards will be used instead of tickets.

--Plans to build up to 600 units of affordable housing on county-owned land.

County Legislator Rob Astorino, who is running for the Republican nomination to oppose Spano, called the speech "a one-hour campaign commercial." He disputed Spano's assertion that the government was efficient, saying, "I think there's been a lot of waste, a lot of inefficiency and a lot of abuse, to be honest with you."

Astorino blamed Spano for financial troubles at the Westchester Medical Center and at Playland and for the length of a recent seven-week strike by bus drivers.

© 2005 by The Associated Press
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blondie



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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree rd.
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks blondie. If the overall costs are laid out, I think many people will agree with us and we'll all be better off, especially young women, but all of us.

rd
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propria



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>> If the overall costs are laid out, I think many people will agree with us <<<


i would certainly think that anybody with any kind of good sense at all would see the obvious value of your recommendations ... and i would even support the more expensive type of bracelet on offenders who molested children [boys as well as girls] under the age of 12 or more than ten years younger than the offender. in any case, using those devices would so quickly and so effectively eliminate these costly and devastating searches for the bodies of dead children that even the expensive type would pay for themselves in very short order.

i consider the electronic bracelet legislation we're seeing now to be an answer to our prayers for justice for these little girls and young women, and i'm still thanking God for people like you who have persistently called for that kind of solution to this horrible problem. fwiw, i also like your idea for a prison just for these sex offenders ... i want to see it way-the-hey out in the desert and run like joe arpaio's lockup in maricopa county, arizona, where the inmates dress in pink underwear, live in army tents just like our troops in iraq, and eat mostly peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

it's pretty tricky to escape from a prison where your only escape route involves days and days of deadly snakes, blazing heat and brutal cold ... and that's before you even get to anywhere you can hide. if we put a facility like that in place, the more word would get around about life in a desert prison with hundreds of other sexual predators, the fewer stories about dead little girls we'd see on the news ... how heartbreaking that it has taken the death of so many children to draw attention to a theme you've been talking about for years now.

once we have all the footloose and fancy free sexual predators wearing bracelets ... which should happen the very minute these laws are voted into effect, regardless of when they were released from prison or how much time they served ... we'll see an immediate improvement in keeping our children safe. the aclu will have a screaming canniption fit, of course, but we can just send 'em out to the desert to hang out with the subhuman monsters they will inevitably rise to defend ... maybe we'll dare 'em to take their own kids along with 'em, just to see how much they really believe that those perverts about to be released, just maybe into their neighborhood, have 'fully paid their debt to society'.


nanci
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benn



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Write to your elected officials. Then if they don't do anything unelect the officials who don't do anything.

Political office is not a career, it is a responsibility.

benn
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rd



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You've hit it right on the head, nanci. I would just add that the monitoring is for all violent ex-felons during probation and people out on bail charged with violent crimes. Registered sex offenders are of course on probation for life.

It is a given that most of these people would be rejailed in short order if we knew where they have been. They are career criminals who see the rest of us as their next victim. Start setting up the cages in the deserts and swamps and tundra. We will need all of them for the violent felons that would be taken off the streets, streets we could walk on once again, for once not searching for missing children.

rd
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rd



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PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2005 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

slashdot.com is running a thread on Jeb Bush's call for GPS tracking. Heavy commenting from the computer crowd at slashdot, where I post as well. I'll post in my comments here.

rd

I called for it in my online book. It's a good true crime murder mystery published on my web site in which I end with calling for GPS tracking of sex offenders. Give it a look.

Murder on a Horse Trail: The Disappearance of Chandra Levy
on www.justiceforchandra.com

rd
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rd



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PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2005 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And what about Jessica Lunsford's killer? All he did was cross the street. He wasn't where he wasn't supposed to be until he fled to Georgia. What if his trashmen left his trash cans on the wrong side of the street? Will an alarm go off when he's within 50 yards of a house where a potential victim lives? Imagine taking care of THAT database! Who defines where are the places he's allowed to go? Yes they would have figured out right away that he did it, but it wouldn't have saved her life. If you're going to strip liberties, at least make it worth it. (not-so-subliminal rabidity activation scheme here)


It should only be GPS recording, not real time monitoring of location. However what this does is nail people on parole who are somewhere they aren't supposed to be, in Couey's case living somewhere different than he gave as his address as required by law.

They would be pulled back into jail if they aren't where they're supposed to be, in other words, it puts teeth into monitoring people on probation.

rd
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rd



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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good news from Florida. A sex offender was released from jail on Monday and on the very first day takes his tracking device off. He's back in jail, you can bet for the duration of his probation which runs for years.

Another offender took his device off, and there's an APB out for him. Florida finally got serious about keeping track of these guys.

I asked in Murder on a Horse Trail what it would take after seeing Carlie Brucia kidnapped off the street and disappear. It took losing two more girls in the Tampa area, Sarah Lunde and Jessica Lunsford, virtually back to back as the nation watched in horror.

It was predictable. We said tracking these violent felons had to happen or more lambs would be slaughtered by wolves roaming for their next victim, confident no one would know what they were doing.

No one listened. The results were predictable. Two more young innocent victims kidnapped from their homes and disappear.

I guess that's what it takes.

rd
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rd



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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An email I sent:

In my book Murder on a Horse Trail: The Disappearance of Chandra Levy, I called for GPS monitoring of offenders and other convicted violent felons on probation in the last chapter, Woman Missing. I tried to make a case for it anyway.

I was not able to get a paperback publisher to take on Murder on a Horse Trail, I am told because they won't publish about open cases, so I have published it on my web site www.justiceforchandra.com. It's now a free online true crime murder mystery book enhanced with maps and pictures. I can't say that I've seen anything like it before on the net. I hope the true crime audience likes it, especially as it may be the only way to write about open cases such as Chandra's.

I also write more about GPS monitoring of offenders there. In particular, I make the argument that it actually would cost less and be far more effective than what we currently do, which is basically wait for dead bodies to show up.

The monitoring I have in mind is not the real time tracking with someone looking at a screen of blips like an air traffic controller. Obviously that is silly. I advocate just recording the GPS locations with the ankle device and having the probation officer/police download the info off the device once a week when the person on probation checks in with them. This kind of task can be done while the probation officer is talking to them, for example.

The GPS locations would then be dumped into a database and no more time is required of police. Several things can happen automatically then with simple GPS location comparisons. Any out of area movement can be seen and reported, the locations can be checked against a list of the GPS locations of sensitive sites that are offlimits and any locations within the forbidden range can be reported, and the nightime locations can be checked against the GPS location of the given home address to confirm residence. All doubt is removed and monitoring is constant and absolute.

More importantly, and this is why I advocate monitoring of all violent felons on probation, any location of a crime scene can be typed in and checked against the movements of every felon on probation. Can you imagine the savings in investigation time trying to determine where the usual suspects were for every crime, and usually only getting worthless alibis from shady acquaintances?

It would stand police investigation as we know it on its head. I came to the conclusion we needed it while writing Murder on a Horse Trail. Two years after Chandra disappeared, police said they still had not been able to locate and talk to dozens of sex offenders. As if talking to someone would have done any good anyway. The whole exercise is maybe just supposed to be an excuse to tell the public they are doing something, I don't know. It is a remarkably incompetent way of doing things.

An argument is made against it that monitoring doesn't prevent the crime. In reply, I'll conclude with a quote from my book I wrote when Carlie Brucia was kidnapped and murdered as I finished up writing Murder on a Horse Trail:

Just as tragic is that two years after Chandra disappeared, police were still interested in investigating several dozen sex offenders. There are too many to investigate. We cannot continue to tolerate defense lawyers saying everyone is innocent because so many could be guilty.

Convicted felons should be monitored until they have completed probation. It makes no sense to think they don't. Until we put an electronic monitoring system in place, we will continue to lose innocent women to predators, predators that have already been caught time and again on lesser offenses and are on parole. These are the people that must be watched, not the entire population or children.

There are several technologies already in place and being used, if we can get to a point in our society of deciding which approach to use we will have achieved something great. If we use more than one of these technologies it has to be part of a unified national system is my only requirement.

The minimum requirement is that it records GPS locations of the person's whereabouts and is periodically uploaded to police. What this does is eliminate the anonymous roaming of the wolves to strike at will on a stray lamb without anyone knowing who could have done it. The GPS locations recorded will show who was at the location. GPS locations are accurate to a few yards.

The recording doesn't stop an abduction, but it ensures that we can tell who was there. If the device is removed or broken without coming in to a police station to report it, then that is the same as breaking out of jail. It means immediate return to incarceration.

If felons know that they cannot get away anonymously with a crime, then it changes their entire psychology. Sure, someone could go berserk, break the device and kill someone, but they know they will not get away with it. Now these felons think they will get away with it.

I say probation instead of life because the length of probation is based on the severity of crime. Registered sex offenders would be life, for example, as that is a type of permanent probation. But if someone had a five year probation and didn't commit another crime, then we need to focus our attention on those who are committing crimes.

The criminals, drug addicts, sex predators, wolves roaming to strike, have stolen goodness from our live's story and replaced it with fear. We need to drop them in cages in the desert, and replace our fear with their fear. Drop food in. Give them a treadmill, although they don't deserve to be treated as well as hamsters.

Women are dead basically because we don't have enough cages for these thugs. Our message to the legal system should be, catch all you want, we'll build more cages.

Pipe sea water into the desert and convert it to fresh water, put solar arrays on top of the cages to shade and power the cages. Who cares if someone gnaws through a bar, the dogs need a workout occasionally anyway.

Once out of their cages, I think Homeland Security has to include monitoring sex offenders and people on parole. They will strike like wolves at a lamb any chance they get. It's either the wolves or the lambs that need constant monitoring, we have to make a choice.

Maybe a little girl's impending death caught on tape will do it. Something must move us to act. Surely we cannot wait for the wolves to strike aqain.


But we did wait. We didn't act. It took losing two more girls in the Tampa area, Sarah Lunde and Jessica Lunsford, virtually back to back as the nation watched in horror. It was predictable. Tracking these violent felons had to happen or more lambs would be slaughtered by wolves roaming for their next victim, confident no one would know what they were doing.

Two more young innocent victims kidnapped from their homes and disappear.

I guess that's what it takes.

Ralph Daugherty
author, Murder on a Horse Trail: The Disappearance of Chandra Levy
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And GPS in California on gang members. Can there be anything more sensible than this to protect us from these criminals?

rd

from http://today.reuters.com (fair use)

California gang members to be tracked by GPS
Thu Mar 16, 2006

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California prison officials have begun using Global Positioning System anklets to track known gang members.

The gritty suburb of San Bernardino, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles, this week became the first California city to use the GPS satellite navigation system to track gang members when the devices were strapped onto three parolees, state Department of Corrections spokeswoman Jeanne Woodford said.

Six California counties began using GPS to monitor sex offenders in 2005 and some have already been arrested for violating parole after they were tracked to off-limits areas.

"GPS tracking is just another tool in the bag; we will still use ground personnel to track gang members," said Sarah Ludeman, another spokeswoman for the corrections department.

Under an arrangement between prison officials and San Bernardino, high-risk parolees known to belong to street gangs will be released from custody on the condition that they wear a GPS bracelet on their ankles at all times.

They appear as moving dots on a map and if they try to remove the anklet or enter unauthorized areas the device sends an alert to a base station monitored by law enforcement officials.

The University of California at Irvine will review the results of the pilot program for its effectiveness.

© Reuters 2006
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some progress made. Congress has passed a sex offender database law that includes:

One initiative would create a demonstration project requiring sex offenders to wear tracking devises during their supervised releases.

They need to record the movements of all volent felons on probation. And then put them away when they attack people yet again.

Because they will.

rd

from www.msnbc.msn.com (fair use)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14027411/

Congress moves to create sex offender database
Bush poised to approve law requiring molesters’ identities made public
Associated Press
July 25, 2006

WASHINGTON - Finding the nearest convicted child molester might be as easy as punching in a ZIP code on a computer keyboard, thanks to a bill that cleared Congress Tuesday.

The House passed and sent to President Bush legislation establishing a national Internet database designed to let law enforcement and communities know where convicted sex offenders live and work.

The most serious offenders would be registered on a national database for a lifetime. All sex offenders could face a felony charge, punishable by 10 years in prison, for failing to update the information.

“This legislation would make it crystal clear to sex offenders, you better register, you better keep the information current, or you’re going to jail,” said Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis.

The House passed it by voice vote. The Senate approved it with a voice vote last week.

Sensenbrenner, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said there are half a million sex offenders in the United States and as many as 100,000 are not registered, their locations unknown to the public and police.

Convicted criminals required to register will have to do so, in person, in each state where they intend to live, work or go to school.

“It’s time for all of our families to have access to this information,” said Rep. Earl Pomeroy, D-N.D.

Evening the score
Child advocates have said the bill offers the most sweeping effort to combat pedophiles in years. It’s named for Adam Walsh, the murdered son of “America’s Most Wanted” host John Walsh.

“We used to track library books better than we do sex offenders but this bill will even that score,” said Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla.

One initiative would create a demonstration project requiring sex offenders to wear tracking devises during their supervised releases.

The bill increases criminal penalties for child predators, including a mandatory minimum 25-year prison sentence for kidnapping or maiming a child and a 30-year sentence for sex with a child under 12 or for sexually assaulting a child between 13 years old and 17 years old.

A new racketeering-style offense for people who commit two or more crimes against children would carry a mandatory 20-year sentence. Repeat child sex offenders would face harsher penalties.

The bill also authorizes new crime prevention and child fingerprinting campaigns, along with new grant programs to combat the sexual abuse of children.

© 2006 The Associated Press
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rd



Joined: 13 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the results I was hoping for when I called for GPS tracking of felons on probation after seeing the debacle of the Chandra Levy investigation.

In the ensuing years I've seen more and more references to felons being tracked with GPS. Here's a very encouraging example in Haleigh Cummings case. (see Missing: Haleigh A Cummings Age 5 (2/10/09)- FL)

Missing Florida Girl's Family: Pedophile Cousin Took Haleigh Cummings
Fox News
February 20, 2009

The family of a little Florida girl who apparently vanished while she was sleeping is afraid she was taken by a pedophile cousin.

The mother and paternal grandmother of 5-year-old Haleigh Cummings said Friday the man in question is a cousin of Misty Croslin, the teenage girlfriend of Haleigh's father, Ronald Cummings.

Police are questioning the cousin, who is from Tennessee and was visiting when Haleigh disappeared before dawn Feb. 10, according to MyFOXOrlando.com.

(snip)

On Thursday a sexual predator was arrested near the trailer home where Haleigh lives with 24-year-old Cummings, 17-year-old Croslin and Haleigh's little brother Junior.

Police said Timothy R. Loucakis was brought in on charges unrelated to the missing child.

"Word is getting out that we have a sexual predator in custody, and we do, but we have no reason to link it to Haleigh," said Putnam County Sheriff Jeff Hardy. He said Loucakis missed his curfew, but GPS tracking showed him "within his home zone" — and not near Haleigh — when she reportedly vanished.

click to read rest
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,497744,00.html


This is exactly the confirmation of whereabouts that allows police to zero in on the real suspect from a sea of convicted sex predators that I argued for.

I'm glad to see it's in action at least in some places.

I hope they find Haleigh ok somewhere but as with the other little Florida girls Jessica Lunsford and Carlie Brucia, among others, abducted by sex predators, unlikely.

rd
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